Angraecums

Angraecums
Angraecum erectum

Friday, March 27, 2015

Angraecum Longidale

       [RE-WRITE: this post is a re-write/update replacing the "Angraecum Memoria Mark Aldridge" post dated March 3, 2015.  Some of the text has been copied to here for an explanation of the re-write.  The Angcm. Memoria Mark Aldridge post has been deleted.]

       The RHS (Royal Horticultural Society) lists the actual parents of Angraecum Memoria Mark Aldridge as follows.  The seed parent is Angcm. sesquipedale and the pollen parent as Angcm. superbum.  Angcm. superbum is a sub-species of Angcm. eburneum.  The plants that I have obtained are tagged as such; but the parentage on the tag reads Angcm. sesquipedale X Angcm. longicalcar.  This difference in parentage is the reason behind the re-write.
       The originator of the Angraecum hybrids was Fred Hillerman.  He did not register either cross because at the time each pollen parent was classified in one name (Angraecum eburneum ssp superbum var. longicalcar).  Only one could be registered and recognized so he decided not to register either.  However, the hybrid with a parentage of Angcm. sesquipedale X Angcm. superbum was registered by Connie Timm with the RHS in late 1993 as  Angcm. Memoria Mark Aldridge.  This name as been associated with both the Angraecum superbum version and the Angraecum longicalcar version. 
       After seeing the blooms on the plants that I had obtained; I was able to compare them to the plant and the blooms that were awarded in 2000 at the Fort Lauderdale orchid show.  The flowers from 2000 were Veitchii type blooms that suffered from "twisty flower", a common issue with some hybrid Angraecums that are crossed where one resupinate and the other non-resupinate.  The flowers tend to open facing down with the nectary/spur pointing in just about any direction.
       In recent years, the RHS has started making certain sub-species and variations their own distinctive species.  With this now in play, the hybrid created by crossing Angcm. sesquipedale and Angcm. longicalcar can be registered as a new hybrid.  As of March 25, 2015, the RHS has officially registered this cross as Angcm. Longidale (a part of each parents name combined to create the hybrid name; the name that Fred Hillerman initially wanted to use when creating the hybrid in 1978).

Angraecum Longidale

       Angraecum Longidale will be a large showy plant.  It can reach a height of nearly 48 inches (120cm) and be just as wide.  New plants can start developing at the base of the plant; sometimes as many as three or four at about the time the plant blooms for the first time.  Keep in mind that this will vary with each plant.  Because of the size of this plant, it is best to pot it (terra cotta) or place in a cedar/plastic basket (plastic usually is best, it will not break down over time).  The container should be large enough to accommodate the plant as it becomes a specimen.
       The root system will be thick.  They can be up to a quarter on an inch (.5cm) and most form at the base of the plant.  If undisturbed, the length can be just about unlimited.  Neither of the parents like the root system messed with, the same goes with this hybrid.  Using a non-organic medium of large material is best.  Chunks of red lava rock, charcoal and large clay pellets (1 1/2 inch [4cm]) will give ample drainage, plenty of air for the roots to breath and a good amount of room for advancement of the root system.  Both parents are considered warm growing and enjoy a substantial amount of water from mid spring into mid fall.  If temperatures are above 90 degrees F (32 degrees C), I water the plants every other day, other wise I will water every three days.  During the cool months, the watering is cut back to every four or five days.  Even though the watering gets cut back in cooler months; the plant is actively growing.
       Do not let water set in the leaf axils, it can cause the root system to rot.  Fertilizer should be applied every 7 - 10 days and use of a systemic fungicide is encouraged every 30 days.  Keep a topical fungicide on hand for use between the monthly treatments.

 Angraecum Longidale with the twist in pedicle allowing the flower's lip to be
non-resupinate and the nectary/spur to hang down.

       Angraecum Longidale receives very bright light but filtered.  In early morning hours until about 11am, the plant can take direct sunlight.  When starting with a plant that is a year or two away from blooming, gradually introduce it to the brighter light.  Seedlings should be given a medium light until they are about four inches (10.2cm).

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Angraecum erectum

       I usually don't write a post until a plant has bloomed at least once.  I've made an exception with Angraecum erectum because of the potential difficulty growing and blooming this Angraecoid in the South Florida tropical climate.  With our summer temperatures of mid eighties to the mid nineties starting in mid spring and running into mid autumn; I realized I was attempting to bloom an orchid that usually is exposed to our winter temperatures of 70 - 75 degrees (21-24C) as the high and 53 - 58 degrees (11.5-14.5C) as the low all year round rather than just two or three months.
       Angraecum erectum is found in a natural habitat at altitude of 4,250 feet (1,300m) and as high as 7,700 feet (2,350m).  It is found extensively in Kenya, west to Uganda and south into Tanzania and Zambia.  I have found it to grow very similar to that of Oeoniella polystachys; growing vertically up the side of tree trunks and very sturdy heavy brush.  Once some height is gained, a series of aerial roots come from the stem and while the base roots do not develop as well.  The main difference between the two plants is that Angcm. erectum will put roots out throughout the length of the entire plant; Oeoniella polystachys will only root from the older part of the stem and not above areas of the stem that have not produced inflorescence.  The plant branches quite freely and will grow vertically most of the time as the main plant grows.
       The plant pictured below is presently 13 inches (33cm) tall and has four new branching plants with three towards the bottom and one near the top.  This individual plant has gained 5 inches (12.8cm) in the last 13 months while the second has gained nearly 6 inches (15cm) in the same time period. 

  Angraecum erectum inflorescence forms opposite leaf axils.  It is uncommon but possible to see two buds.

       The plant above as well as a second plant mounted the same way receives 1200 - 1600 foot candles of light (medium shade) daily all year round.  It is not exposed to any direct sunlight at all.  In its natural habitat, Angcm. erectum has two dry seasons and two wet seasons; each season lasts roughly two to three months.  Here in South Florida, the plant is watered every two to three days during the dry season (cooler winter days) and every morning during the wet season (mid March into late October).
       I fertilize my Angcm. erectum every seven to ten days from late March into mid November and every two weeks in late fall to late winter.  It has shown consistent growth in plant height and root development.  I use a systemic fungicide every 4 - 5 weeks; alternating two variations every three or four months to prevent any issues with a resistance to fungus.

The color of Angcm. erectum can be a light yellow-green, greenish white or a subdued salmon color.

       With the amount of positive growth over the last year or so, it is best to be overly cautious as I wait to see whether the buds fully develop and open properly.  South Florida temperatures over the last couple of weeks have been in the low to upper 70s.  One thing that can cause bud blast is heat and our temperatures are about to go into the low to mid 80s.  I will post an update as soon as the buds open and will gladly share all of the images.

 [UPDATE: February 8, 2015... The above image was obtained 2 weeks after the initial
image of the first bud was obtained.  The images below were obtained the same day
as this one.  The Angraecum erectum buds have started to open.]

[UPDATE: February 8, 2015... The flowers of Angcm. erectum are not pristine white as
many other of the Angraecoids.  As stated earlier, they can range from a yellowish green,
greenish white or subdued salmon color.  Thesse flowers are a very light yellowish
cream white.]

[UPDATE: February 8, 2015... Angcm. erectum flowers are rather small compared to the
height of the plant itself.  The horizontal spread of the flowers here is
1.9 cm (3/4 of an inch); the vertical spread is 1.7 cm (11/16 of an inch) and the over
all length including the spur/nectary is 3 cm (1 3/16 of an inch).  The sepals are
slightly larger than the petals.]

[UPDATE: February 13, 2015... There are four flowers on the
plant now.  The flowers are small compared to the plant's height;
but it is still an impressive Angraecum.  Not a showy orchid as the
larger types; but once the branches mature it should be a
remarkable specimen plant.]

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Growing Angraecum Orchids Using Semi-Hydroponic Techniques

       "This guest post was written upon my request by Professor Chris Johnson from the University of Utah.  Dr. Johnson has a passion like so many of us; orchids.  This post addresses his issue regarding the watering of various genera of orchids when he has to travel as much as he does.  A fair amount of those orchids being Angraecums.  Keep in mind, doing the research and testing with one or two plants in the beginning rather than your entire collection should cut the mortality rate to a minimum.  What works for one may not work for another."  Tom K

       After I found Tom's great Angraecum orchid blog and the related Facebook page, I sent Tom a few questions regarding Angraecum culture and made several posts to his blog.  One day I was re-potting some Angraecum magdalenae seedlings to larger pots and I sent Tom a photo (Figure 1) of one of the seedling's root systems growing in semi-hydroponic media.  After seeing the photo, Tom thought that other folks growing Angraecums might be interested in learning more about growing them (and other genera) in semi-hydroponics.

(Figure 1) Angraecum magdalenae root system grown semi-hydroponically

       I started growing orchids the way I suspect most people have.  I'd purchase a wonderful orchid at the grocery store; but I was unable to get it to bloom again.  I starting reading about orchid culture on websites and in books and figured out that our very dry climate in Salt Lake City was not optimal for most orchids.  I decided to purchase an orchidarium, which is basically a Wardian case in which one can control temperature, humidity and air flow.  You can purchase (or build) one to suit your orchid needs and budget.  My first orchidarium is shown in Figure 2.

(Figure 2) First orchidarium containing traditional potted orchids

       As you can see, at this point, all of the orchids are potted in traditional media and plastic pots.  After having significant success in growing orchids in my orchidarium, I purchased a second and eventually a third.  I proceeded to build a greenhouse to hold my expanding collection of mostly fragrant orchids including Angraecums, Cattleyas, Dendrobiums, Lycastes and Zygopetalums as well as other genera.  As my collection grew, I realized that the various orchids had different culutal needs, and in particular, different watering schedules.  
       For my job as a Professor of Computer Science and director of a large research institute, I have to travel both nationally and internationally multiple times a year.  There was no practical way I could keep up with so many orchids with so many different watering needs given my travel schedule.  Fortunately I happened upon an article in the November 2006 American Orchid Society's Orchids magazine titled "No Longer a Killer" by Charles Rhodes ( http://firstrays.com/semi-hydroponic-culture/no-longer-a-killer-aos-article-by-charles-rhodes/ ).  
       In the article Charles describes using a technique called semi-hydroponics created by Ray Barkalow; that can be used to grow most genera of orchids.  Barkalow developed the technique in part because he had a busy travel schedule similar to mine and needed an easy way to water all of his orchids at the same time.  Ray maintains a wonderful website dedicated to using semi-hydroponics to grow orchids ( http://firstrays.com/semi-hydroponic-culture/general-semi-hydroponics-information/ )  which I devoured.  I then started experimenting with semi-hydroponics myself.
       One main feature of semi-hydroponics is that instead of using an organic potting medium such as bark or sphagnum moss it relies on an inert clay aggregate media called LECA (Lightweight Expanded Clay Aggregate).  There are various brands of LECA, the most popular being Hydroton and PrimeAgra.  The LECA won't decay over time like bark and moss and so provides a stable medium, maintaining a constant supply of moisture with good wicking capability and providing good air flow to the roots.  According to the technique, I plant my orchids in plastic pots with one or two quarter inch holes drilled about one inch from the bottom of the pot to provide a water reservoir.  I water them by filling up the pot to the top with water then allowing the pots to drain.  The frequency of watering is determined by the season, temperature and specific genera of orchid (as with all orchid potting materials).

(Figure 3) Angcm. magdalenae growing semi-hydroponically 

       In Figure 3, Angraecum magdalenae is potted in a plastic pot with PrimeAgra LECA media.  A quarter inch hole has been drilled one inch above the bottom of the pot.  You will also notice the quarter inch black tubing with a flow valve.  All of my orchids are watered (pots filled to the top and allowed to drain) using an automatic watering system shown in Figure 4 (details for a watering system can be found at http://firstrays.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=294 ).

(Figure 4) Automatic watering system
       I have had a lot of success growing a number of Angraecums in semi-hydroponics as you can see in the photos at the bottom of this post.  If you are looking for an easier way to grow Angraecums and other genera, you might want to try semi-hydroponics.  Be sure to understand the needs of your orchids and do extensive research regarding this technique.
       Once the orchids are  well established, they will grow very well.  Re-potting is simple due to the fact you can just lift the plant from  the old pot, place it in the new container and fill the void with additional LECA.  I have orchids growing in small three inch pots all the way up to plants growing in eighteen inch pots using the semi-hydroponics.
       One of the most important considerations when moving orchids that have been growing in traditional organic media to semi-hydroponic LECA media is timing.  You want to make sure there is new root growth on the plant before transferring it to LECA, as when transitioning an orchid from any type of  growing medium to a considerably different type (or even from the same medium if the old has decayed, as the medium properties will be significantly different between old and new).  It takes a while for the plant rootss to adapt to the new medium.  Here  are two good links that describe the process of moving orchids from traditional media to LECA: http://interiorwatergardeens.com/cultural_files/hydroponics/a%20simplified%20method.html and http://firstrays.com/semi-hydroponic-culture/general-semi-hydroponics-information/repotting-into-sh-from-traditional-media/

Angcm. Crestwood            Angcm. Memoria George Kennedy              Angcm. Longiscott

           Angcm. sesquipedale          Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty            Angcm. magdalenae

       "Professor Johnson has spent a considerable amount of time doing research as well as experimenting in perfecting this technique for himself.  Be sure to follow suit if deciding to try semi-hydroponics with your orchids.  I stress again; what works for one grower may not work for you"  TomK

Saturday, November 1, 2014

First Time Bloomers (Part 2)

       This is the second group of "First Time Bloomers" to be posted.  As I said earlier, I will post new Angraecoid plants as they bloom for the first time.  On occasions, I may show a comparison of a mature plant to that of a plant in flower for the first time.

Angraecum Memoria George Kennedy is a hybrid that was registered with the RHS in 1981; the originator was D. Nail.  The seed parent is Angcm. eburneum ssp. giryamae while the pollen parent is Angcm. eburneum ssp. comorense.  Each sub-species is a variation of Angcm. eburneum.  One of the traits that stands out is that of the nectary (spur); it resembles that of the pollen parent; close to a half inch longer than the traditional Angcm. eburneum.  Another trait that is dominant in the hybrid is the nonresupinate uppermost lip; about a half inch to three quarters of an inch larger than the seed parent.  This is one of four plants that is grown in 100% red lava rock (medium to coarse sized pcs. allowing for fast drainage and plently of room for the root system to develop).  It receives a range of bright diffused sun light that measures 2500 FC to 4000 FC year round.  The amount of water the plant is given varies depending upon the time of year.  Summer watering is every other day and what ever rain it receives late spring through early fall.  Once temperatures come down into the upper 70s, water is reduced to every three to four days.  Angcm. Memoria George Kennedy doesn't appear to have a dormant period so I fertilize every week throughout the year.  I have observed an extremely fast development in the root system where the roots will begin to grow outside of the pot or basket; be sure to prevent those roots from attaching to anything around the plant.

 Angraecum leonis, this individual plant is the Madagascar variety; the other variety is from the Comoros Islands and can be more than double the size (see the post dated February 25, 2013, Angraecum leonis [Size Identifies]).  Angcm. leonis, no matter the variety usually will show you when there is a lack of water reaching the plant.  When the plant is young, its root system hasn't really reached any length.  Leaves that show a sign of wrinkling is a warning that the plant is under stress for lack of water.  It is imperative that you watch younger plants for this sign.  A strong indication of a healthy root system is the thickness of the leaves; moisture is stored in those leaves where carbohydrates are produced to nourish the plant.  The Madagascar variety usually has leaves that are 2 to 3 times thicker. A trait common due to the lack of rain in the region.  The Comoros variety receives a large amount of rain and will be more than twice the size as mentioned.  As either variety of the plants matures, it will start to produce an aerial root system (in a natural habitat, the root system secures the plant to the branches and limbs and provides more moisture and nutrients).

  Aerangis mystacidii X Aerangis decaryana; registered in November, 2012 by Sarah Waddoups (congrats Sarah), the originator was Klinge Orchids.  The above images were the first blooms from October 2013.  The plant is mounted to a 4 x 6 inch (10x15cm) cork slab.  It receives 1,800 - 2,500 FC of medium light daily.  It is watered every morning in South Florida's 10 month warm season and very often misted late afternoon if temperatures are in the upper 80s or higher.  Watering is cut back to every other day throughout most of December and January.  The plant receives fertilizer every week through the warm season and every two weeks during the two cooler months in Winter. 
 

Saturday, September 13, 2014

First Time Bloomers

       One of the amazing things about being an orchid hobbyist is watching the various plants blooming for the first time.  I personally will have up to a half a dozen of the same plant in various types of culture.  I will pot in clay and in baskets using different mediums and mount the plants to a selection of materials; keeping records of the growth stages and eventually photographing the first blooms that appear.  I am often asked about the size of a plant before it blooms for the first time.  That answer varies depending upon the genera and species of the individual plant.  This post will show what I have experienced in the last six months with some of the Angraecoids that are in my collection.

Neobathiea perrieri, the flower is about 2 inches (5.1cm) high, 1.5 inches (3.9cm) wide and the nectary    is 4 inches (10cm) long;  the plant is mounted to a small cube of cork that is about 2.5 - 2.75 at its widest.  The plant itself is compact and barely reaches 2 inches (5cm) high with leaves that can be 4 inches (10cm) long.  Watered every morning and late afternoon when temperatures are above the low eighties (27 degrees C); light is now stronger than 1,500 fc and air movement is steady.

Angraecum Longiscott is the Angraecoid that started it all.  My first bloomed in the summer 0f 2000.  The above plant is one from a batch I obtained from H & R Orchids about two years ago.  This plant is nearly 15 inches (38.2cm) tall with the stem reaching 9 inches (23cm) long.  The leaves are 8 - 10 inches (20.5-25.5cm) long.  Average flower width is 2.5 inches (6.3cm), the vertical measurement is 4.75 inches (7cm), the nectary is 8 inches (20.2cm).  The above plant is potted in a 6 inch (15cm) clay pot with a medium to coarse coconut husk material; it is watered every other morning when temps are above the low eighties (28 degrees C) and every third to fourth day when below 80 degrees F (26.5 degrees C) and receives direct sunlight until about 12pm and then the light level drops to about 2,500 fc for the remainder of the day.  As long as the flowers are protected from the elements, they can last 5 - 6 weeks.  FRAGRANT!

Aerangis mystacidii, the image on the left is just now starting to bloom.  It is a plant that was a part of a group I obtained two years ago.  The image on the right is that of a plant that bloomed a year ago for the first time.  Although they were from the same group of seedlings, the first blooming of each plant was a year apart.  Each are mounted to a cork slab that is 5 x 3 inches (15x7.6x3cm) in size.  These plants are watered daily and when temperatures are 85 degrees F (29.5 degrees C) or above will get watered in mid to late afternoon.  They receive about 1,200 - 1,500 fc.  These blooms will last about 10 - 14 days.

As more first time blooms appear, they will be added to this post.

Sunday, September 7, 2014

The Variations of Angraecum Lemforde White Beauty

       I started growing Angraecum Lemforde White Beauty about seven years ago for the simple fact that I could not get Angcm. magdalenae to bloom.  I had no problem getting Angcm. magdalenae to grow or eventually put out basal keikis.  I could not get them to bloom.  The plant grows in a natural habitat at altitudes of between 4,700 ft. to 6,000 ft. (1,433m-1,830m) and temperatures have nearly a 20 - 25 F (9-11 degrees C) difference during the day compared to night time.  It is my opinion through observation and experience that Angcm. magdalenae is not a heat tolerant orchid (it is usually described as an intermediate to cool growing plant).
       I chose Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty because the shape of the flower was so similar to that of Angcm. magdalenae.  Listed by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) as the seed parent while Angcm. sesquipedale is listed as the pollen parent.  Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty was registered in 1984 and the originator was Lemfoerder Orchids.

Two entirely different Angcm. Lemforde White Beautys

       Regarding this post, here lies the issue; I photographed what was labeled as Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty at the Miami International Orchid Show this past fall (2013).  Due to the flower's shape, I was confused as to what the plant really was.  Traits that I had become accustomed to were nowhere to be seen in the flower.  My first thought was that the plant had been labeled incorrectly.  The structure of the plant itself appeared to be that of Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty.  It had closely grown alternating leaves coming from the stem with the bottom third of the stem being thick and bulky.  Leaves were seven to nine inches (20-23cm) in length and up to 3 inches (7cm) wide.  It was suggested that the plant may have been that of Angcm. Crestwood.  That was ruled out because there was no plant structure bearing any resemblance of Crestwood traits an the flower was a very pristine white; absolutely no yellow/green tint in the sepals or the petals (the most notable Angcm. Veitchii trait in the Crestwood hybrid).
       After talking to several people about the difference of the two flowers, I looked into the variations that take place in hybridizing.  Once you have a basic understanding of creating a hybrid, the following explanation made the most sense.  
       I found an article published in the American Orchid Society (AOS) Bulletin, January 1974 issue written by Fred Hillerman.  He clearly states "...Jones and Scully sold seedlings of a cross of Angcm. sesquipedale X Angcm. magdalenae, but I have seen no mention of its flowering."  This seedling cross being sold more than fifteen years before Angraecum Lemforde White Beauty was registered.  The seedling cross (seedling #1528) was confirmed by Robert Scully as being sold in 1968.  He goes on to explain the the seedlings were actually from a flask obtained by Jones and Scully (J&S) from Marcel Lecoufle in 1965.  The small seedlings were reflasked from a single bottle to two bottles that were grown out to a salable size and then were sold as a catalog offering in 1968.  At the time, Marcel Lecoufle was considered a major link to the world of Angraecoid genera.
       Nearly twenty years had passed since the initial introduction of the unregistered hybrid between Angcm. sesquipedale and Angcm. magdalenae.  In 1984, the originator, Lemfoerder Orchids, registers the hybrid Angcm Lemforde White Beauty with the RHS.  The parents are officially listed as Angcm. magdalenae as the seed parent crossed with the pollen parent being Angcm. sesquipedale (notice that the parents have been switched from the cross obtained by J&S from Marcel Lecoufle).
       When a grower makes a decision to cross certain plants it is not uncommon that the reason(s) is to increase or decrease the size and shape of the flower, change the color(s) of the flower, lengthen the time the flower will stay in bloom or to change the size and shape ot the plant itself as well as other traits.  I recently sent an email to Lemfoerder Orchideenzucht hoping that someone could answer one specific question; "...what was the main reason to creating the hybrid Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty?"  I received a response almost immediately from Dr. Peter Reuter regarding the creation of the hybrid.  He states that the main reason was to decrease the plant size of Angcm. sesquipedale; which was achieved.
       Dr. Reuter also added that the results would be different depending on the quality of plants being used in the hybridizing.  As an example switching the pod parent and the seed parent would change the overall results (I'll address this issue in a moment).  He also wrote that Angcm. bosseri systematically is the same as Angcm. sesquipedale and was used which produced additional variations. 
       In 1986, Fred Hillerman wrote in his book (An Introduction to the Cultivated Angraecoid Orchids of Madagascar, pg. 216); he states that he "...had not yet seen the plant and that it should have been crossed years ago.  That it should also avoid the twist problem suffered by Veitchii type crosses.  Magdalenae will probably greatly reduce the size of the sesquipedale plant and also result in a larger flower."  It is believed that seedlings were available through Angraecum House (Fred Hillerman's business) at the time his book was published.  A project he had started a couple of years prior.
       Upon the release of the Angraecum House 1989 price list/catalog, Fred again mentions Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty.  Listed on pg. 4 of the price list, "...beat us to the punch here but we think our 'Star of Malagasy' FCC X to the best magdalenae we have will give us a real winner.  Our first one has flowered and it;s everything we could have wished for."  I have had conversations with Lisa Hillerman (Fred's youngest daughter) and she remembers her dad crossing Angcm. magdalenae with Angcm. sesquipedale and wanting to create a larger magdalenae type flower yet smaller than the sesquipedale.  The flower type that I have bloomed now for more than six years.
       What I have tried to do here is to show that several people in different parts of the world were hybridizing Angcm. magdalenae and Angcm. sesquipedale to achieve a specific goal.  Each grower according to their own results were successful in their attempts.  Imagine hundreds of offspring from a single cross.  Not all of those plants will appear similar.  Some will carry the traits of the seed parent while others the pollen parent.  With a large portion carrying traits of both parents.
       The illustration below should give you a better understanding as to the distribution of the various flower types and the explanation I was looking for regarding the extreme difference in flower types.

  
       The white star represents the flower that bloomed in 2008.  Flower shape was similar to that of the seed parent and a larger size.  The sepals and petals were thick at the base and came to a point with a slight curl.  The black star represents the flower from 2013.  The flower shape was very close to the pollen parent yet still had a slight curl rather than reflex to the sepals and petals.  Looking at the illustration, you can now imagine the room for the various offspring and where that offspring may come from regarding the location on the table and the traits the offspring will carry.
       Switching the seed and pollen parents around may change the traits of some of the individual offspring is considered by some as speculative.  There is a lot of room on the table and many of those results would be similar as though they haven't traded ends of the table.  One last note, no matter what the seed or the pollen parent is, the hybrid grex name would remain the same.

       [UPDATE Oct. 27, 2014: I recently rec'd several photographs of an Angcm. Lemforde White Beauty which bloomed for Chris Johnson, one of the blog's readers. As can be seen in the image above, the form of the flower resembles traits more familiar with Angcm. magdalenae than Angcm. sesquipedale.  Comparing Chris's bloom to mine shows that both plants came from a section of a table closer to Angcm. magdalenae.]