Angraecums

Angraecums
Angraecum Longidale

Saturday, November 1, 2014

First Time Bloomers (Part 2)

       This is the second group of "First Time Bloomers" to be posted.  As I said earlier, I will post new Angraecoid plants as they bloom for the first time.  On occasions, I may show a comparison of a mature plant to that of a plant in flower for the first time.

Angraecum Memoria George Kennedy is a hybrid that was registered with the RHS in 1981; the originator was D. Nail.  The seed parent is Angcm. eburneum ssp. giryamae while the pollen parent is Angcm. eburneum ssp. comorense.  Each sub-species is a variation of Angcm. eburneum.  One of the traits that stands out is that of the nectary (spur); it resembles that of the pollen parent; close to a half inch longer than the traditional Angcm. eburneum.  Another trait that is dominant in the hybrid is the nonresupinate uppermost lip; about a half inch to three quarters of an inch larger than the seed parent.  This is one of four plants that is grown in 100% red lava rock (medium to coarse sized pcs. allowing for fast drainage and plently of room for the root system to develop).  It receives a range of bright diffused sun light that measures 2500 FC to 4000 FC year round.  The amount of water the plant is given varies depending upon the time of year.  Summer watering is every other day and what ever rain it receives late spring through early fall.  Once temperatures come down into the upper 70s, water is reduced to every three to four days.  Angcm. Memoria George Kennedy doesn't appear to have a dormant period so I fertilize every week throughout the year.  I have observed an extremely fast development in the root system where the roots will begin to grow outside of the pot or basket; be sure to prevent those roots from attaching to anything around the plant.

 Angraecum leonis, this individual plant is the Madagascar variety; the other variety is from the Comoros Islands and can be more than double the size (see the post dated February 25, 2013, Angraecum leonis [Size Identifies]).  Angcm. leonis, no matter the variety usually will show you when there is a lack of water reaching the plant.  When the plant is young, its root system hasn't really reached any length.  Leaves that show a sign of wrinkling is a warning that the plant is under stress for lack of water.  It is imperative that you watch younger plants for this sign.  A strong indication of a healthy root system is the thickness of the leaves; moisture is stored in those leaves where carbohydrates are produced to nourish the plant.  The Madagascar variety usually has leaves that are 2 to 3 times thicker. A trait common due to the lack of rain in the region.  The Comoros variety receives a large amount of rain and will be more than twice the size as mentioned.  As either variety of the plants matures, it will start to produce an aerial root system (in a natural habitat, the root system secures the plant to the branches and limbs and provides more moisture and nutrients).

  Aerangis mystacidii X Aerangis decaryana; registered in November, 2012 by Sarah Waddoups (congrats Sarah), the originator was Klinge Orchids.  The above images were the first blooms from October 2013.  The plant is mounted to a 4 x 6 inch (10x15cm) cork slab.  It receives 1,800 - 2,500 FC of medium light daily.  It is watered every morning in South Florida's 10 month warm season and very often misted late afternoon if temperatures are in the upper 80s or higher.  Watering is cut back to every other day throughout most of December and January.  The plant receives fertilizer every week through the warm season and every two weeks during the two cooler months in Winter. 
 

1 comment:

  1. My somalensis is pretty close to blooming. Would you be interested in trading pollen? I'd be interested in pollen from other relatively drought tolerant species or hybrids.

    ReplyDelete

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